Cincinnati Enquirer: Mercury in the Ohio River: To Mix or not to mix

Twelve years ago, pollution monitors banned diluting mercury into the Ohio River, a demand still under negotiation.

Across a small lake in the flood plain of the Ohio River, fish jump from the water on a gorgeous, late-summer morning.

A fisherman casts into the blue waters of one of several lakes on a 2,500-acre preserve straddling the Indiana-Ohio border, at a place known as Oxbow. The lakes are full of fish and the fisherman has a good chance at a crop of crappie, blue gill and bass.

But he’ll want to throw all but one back.

The Ohio River Fish Consumption Advisories urge him and others not to eat more than one fish per month from the river – including these wetlands, which flood at least three times a year.

Why? Mercury and other chemicals, byproducts of industry, that build up in fish over time create potential health risks.

KEEP READING

BACK TO CLEAN WATER

ELPC’s Founding Vision is Becoming Today’s Sustainability Reality

Support ELPC’s Next 25 Years of Successful Advocacy

Donate Now